generalpitchiner:

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"And this is my Daughter, Seraphina you touch her and you die.

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"Pleasure to me-"image

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"Excuse me?"

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"I want to Keep you you"

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"F̴͉̭̣̺͛͒͐̒̔̀̕ọ̢̨̱̻͚͔̲͉̲ͨ̇̄ͪ͋̚͢r̷̘̠͉̞̜͚̪ͦ̄ͨ͞e̷͚̬͚̳̓̋̒̆ͭ͘ͅv̜͓̭͔ͪ͑͋͗͒̊̀e̎ͤ̾̓̽̾҉̡̭̖̰̦̣̺̙r̶̀ͯ̃̅̓͊̋͏̱̲̫̺͔̣̰"

Writing Tips#167: Six Simple (and Difficult) Tips for Dealing With Writer’s Block

bookgeekconfessions:

Tips by Naomi
Originally Posted on: Confessions of an Opinionated Book Geek

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Writer’s Block is one of the most difficult parts of being a writer. You finally stop procrastinating, you open your document and…nothing. You just don’t have ideas or the ideas is just on the tip of your tongue. You can feel it, but it’s just not coming out. Here are some tips that help me when I have hit a wall.

1.Read what you have written so far.
Have you already taken a break, had a breather and walked away from the project? Come back to it and read what you have so far. Even if it’s a sentence or an outline. Just read it. You’ll start to edit this, think about that and suddenly ideas will start flooding in. Instead of this happening on page 10, maybe it should be page 20, and so it will lead in to your catalyst, etc. Just reading what you have written down  should help get you in the flow of things.

2. Just Write.
I don’t care if it sucks or if it’s stupid or if you hate it. Just put pen to paper, or hand to keyboard. Just start getting the creative flow going. Write anything. Write a monologue, write a conversation between two characters, write your main character’s diary entry, etc. Just write.


3. Research.
Maybe you’re stuck, because there is something you can’t figure out. Or something that doesn’t sit well with you. Start reading about your subject. Are you writing about a dystopian future? Do research on what would happen if there is a WWIII. Research chemical warfare or about a town that has been ravaged by a tsunami. Read about things that are directly connected to your subject and indirectly connected. Interview people who have lived through events similar to the ones that happen in your book. Read a medical journal that covers the disease that your main character has. Get new realities and that will hopefully lead to new ideas.


4. Read a blog or watch an interview with your favorite author.
Listen, lets face it I wish I was Ilona Andrews, Jane Austen or Julia Quinn.  Just last week I read Ilona Andrews’ blog and she is struggling with her latest Kate Daniels book. It’s shocking. You’d think after a bunch of your books have been published, you’d be a well oiled machine. Nope, even your favorite writer’s hit a wall. That’s why reading a blog post or watching an interview about them can help.

Books by my favorite authors make me feel amazing and just thinking about their work makes me want to create my own. And it is my dream to make someone feel the way they make me feel. They inspire me to write more and maybe your fave author will inspire you to write more.

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"I adore your terrifying sincerity."

Anaïs Nin, from a letter to Henry Miller (via violentwavesofemotion)

// Little bit of family time for today’s warm up. Koz teaching one of the eldest to write and Sera drawing on the wall with Adam.

// Little bit of family time for today’s warm up. Koz teaching one of the eldest to write and Sera drawing on the wall with Adam.

loish:

quick speedpaint as a break from some commissioned work, skintones + palette very leyendecker inspired. on deviantart

loish:

quick speedpaint as a break from some commissioned work, skintones + palette very leyendecker inspired. on deviantart

generalpitchiner:

Pitchiner: “Cause you didn’t get this behavior from me.”

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